ALLELOPATHIC EFFECT OF SAGE ON GERMINATION AND INITIAL GROWTH OF MAIZE

DORINA BONEA

Abstract


Salvia officinalis L. (sage) is a medicinal plant cited for its strong allelopathic effects. This plant is being studied for its pesticidal potential and much less for its biostimulant activities. The development of new biostimulants in the context of sustainable crop management, is necessary. The aim of the  study was to determine allelopathic effect of sage on germination and initial growth of maize (Zea mays L.) Two experiments were conducted under laboratory conditions to determine effect of cogermination of sage and maize seeds and effect of sage aqueous extracts from fresh and dry sage biomass in concentrations of 5%, 10% and 20%, were investigated. Sage seeds in cogermination with maize and aqueous extracts of sage showed not significant effects on germination percentage, but showed significant effects on maize seedlings. The shoot and root length was strongly inhibited by cogermination. On the contrary, shoot length of maize was stimulated by the lowest concentration of extracts (5%), while it was inhibited by higher concentration (20%). For the root length, a slight stimulation  (not significant) was observed at the 5% and 10% concentrations of sage extracts, while it was inhibited by 20% concentration. It can be concluded that dilute concentrations of sage can be utilized as a natural source (biostimulants) for initial growth of maize.



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